A Passion for Philanthropy

I recently came across a memorable post on LinkedIn:

Want to be happy for a day, take a nap.

Want to be happy for a year, collect an inheritance.

Want to be happy for a lifetime, find a way to help others.

Do you enjoy giving your time to help others? While volunteering is a fantastic way to begin, have you ever thought of donating your talent? Perhaps you are an avid runner and enjoy donating time to local family fun runs or hosting a chapter of Girls on the Run. Have a talent working with animals? Perhaps you donate time at a local shelter or raise a PAWS with a cause puppy. I challenge you to do more than volunteer, combine philanthropy with your passion!

Many of you know I love my music. For the past year and a half, I have been working with a talented pair of ladies, crafting music, a mixture of Irish, Scottish, and Americana. Each member brings special talents:

Colleen-Our fearless leader, whose talents include lead and back-up vocals, guitar, cajon and percussion

Paula-Sharing her skill with lead and back-up vocals, guitar, cajon, and percussion

Maggie-Sharing lead and back-up vocals, Strumstick, viola, and tin whistle

As a result of the Celtic influence in our music, March remains a busy month. However, we found time to help a local charity dear to my heart, Kyomi’s Gift. This organization was created after the loss of my dear niece, Kyomi, at only 4 months of age. The Murphy Family wanted to give back, so Kyomi’s Gift was formed. For the past 14 years, we have raised money to help parents with sick children, so they can spend more time together.

This year, Kyomi’s Gift is hosting an afternoon of Irish fun in Hastings! There’s something for everyone: Irish trivia, Silent Auction, Irish jig competition, Corned beef and cabbage supper, Cash bar, and…

Kilkenny Corker’s in Concert!

Here are a few tunes from a recent practice:

See you on March 16!

Thanks for reading!

Can’t make it? Interested in donating to Kyomi’s Gift?

Kilkenny Corker’s on Facebook

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Turkey Day with a Side of Mercy

While it always hurts to come across hateful comments about my father on social media, last month, I started receiving such comments on my personal accounts. Anger has often been my initial response in such situations. Recently, I did something unexpected, I paused and remembered a song I was learning, a song about mercy and how we all could use it.

I changed my focus and quickly recognized both the hate and pain surging through this troubled individual. The prudent option here was to ignore what was not really an attack, but an individual in pain, lashing out; in addition, adjusting my thinking helped me deal with such posts. I wondered where else “mercy” was needed…

Every semester, I perform for the Music Appreciation class at the college. This time, in addition to the usual presentation about oral tradition and Appalachian folk music, I added a current song I was learning. While the song is still in need of a final polish (and an amp for the strumstick), it felt right to sing about mercy. This holiday season, in addition to thankfulness, where do you need to show mercy? Is there a rift from long ago in need of attention? Are you still avoiding family members with differing political views? Perhaps it’s time to “mend the bond.”

Thanks for reading and have a blessed Thanksgiving!

Time to stock up on Lip Balm!

https://www.etsy.com/listing/229658359/set-of-4-all-natural-beeswax-lip-balms

Kilkenny Corkers in Concert

This past weekend, Kilkenny Corkers opened for the Irish band, One for the Foxes. Thank you to the audience members who shared video clips. Below is a montage, something from Paula, Maggie, and Colleen.

Found this YouTube video from One for the Foxes:

Live performances provide a glimpse into the “heart and soul” of music, difficult to capture in studio recording. I hope you have time to relax at an outdoor concert this summer and support this craft.

Best of luck, One for the Foxes, on your summer tour!!!

Thanks for reading!

Introducing Kilkenny Corkers

Recently, I performed at a new venue, the house concert!

According to Wikipedia, “A house concert or home concert is a musical concert or performance art that is presented in someone’s home or apartment, or a nearby small private space such as a barn…or back yard.”

Such performances provide a more meaningful experience, as the music fills the room, the artist has the opportunity to share more stories and later visit with the audience (Where else could I share how Great-Grandpa and his graduating class were kicked out of medical school?). Ideal for acoustic music, the atmosphere is casual with each guest usually bringing something to share.

Colleen, Paula, and I are proud to present, Kilkenny Corkers. We are a Celtic music group, performing Irish and Scottish folk music. Our music includes a mix of slow ballads, history, a few family stories, and those fun, rowdy pub tunes. An evening with Kilkenny Corkers goes well with a few pints and a few friends.

While we are “moms with day jobs,” we do still have limited availability for the St. Patrick’s Day season. Need Celtic music for your venue? Please share your request on the Contact Information tab.

Thanks for reading!

Dragonflies of Autumn

I’ve seen many dragonflies lately. They keep appearing around the farm, perched on the screen to the backyard, resting on leaves in the garden… Recently, I learned that dragonflies symbolize change, more specifically, growth and maturity. Perhaps this is a nudge back to music.

 
Last month, I had the opportunity to volunteer locally, singing for a few groups. I enjoyed performing Irish music, plus a few American favorites for a sing along, and later sharing lunch and visiting with the audience. Preparing for these performances, I had the opportunity to organize my music collection and found a few new Irish tunes to add to the repertoire.

 
Instead of recording on Soundcloud, I decided to create a video, including a bit of creative filming courtesy of my daughter (pardon the construction project and MKs backyard horse jumping course made from bricks, logs, and buckets). Enjoy!

 

Happy Fall!!!

Thanks for reading!

The Journey Home

 

It seems like a lifetime has passed since December’s post. Early December brought pneumonia for me, and then after Christmas, life proceeded to worse. Chad suffered a serious fall and the next day, Patrick’s friend was killed in a car accident. Chad’s on the mend, and we are attempting to help our son through his loss. As a parent, the challenges of bridging this horrible passage never occurred.

Most generations remember losing and mourning a friend gone too young. I remember those friends lost in high school and college, the pain, questions, and numbness. As parents we sit by helplessly, attempting to ease the grief. While we can certainly be there for support, nothing helps more than letting our young grieve together. Perhaps this is part of letting go; our children need the chance to be with their peers to truly sort things out. As a woman, I also didn’t expect how certain difficult, manual activities provide closure for our men, my father-in-law building his granddaughter’s coffin twelve year’s ago or my son and his friends actually picking up shovels and burying their friend.

When dealing with death, I often think of J.R.R. Tolkien’s glimpse through Gandalf’s words in “The Lord of the Rings”:

“…The journey doesn’t end here. Death is just another path…One that we all must take…The grey rain-curtain of this world rolls back, and all turns to silver glass…and then you see it…White shores…and beyond. A far green country under a swift sunrise.”

I don’t begin to know or claim what’s to come, but I have often found solace in Tolkien’s words and prefer to follow my parents’ words of wisdom. “We all have a journey ahead, a topic worthy of reflection.” The following song, from the late 70s has often brought me peace. Also, after witnessing the visitation, bagpiper’s procession and funeral (and later, watching my husband’s stubbornness and strength to get back to work), I truly understand what Maureen O’Hara meant when she said, “We Irish are a fighting people.”

RIP  Jeremiah

wrestling Patrick and Jer

 

 

For Auld Lang Syne, My Dear

family pic

 

Ever since I could remember, our family had a tradition. We would join hands at midnight on New Year’s Eve and slowly walk in a circle and sing, “Auld Lang Syne.” The tradition can be traced as far back as my Great Grandpa Stewart, born in Nova Scotia, a proud descendent of those re-located through the Highland Clearances.

Auld Lang Syne was a poem written by Robert Burns. Upon further research, I learned there are several versions of the tune, including Burns’ original “Scots verse” and an English translation. My family, apparently, was singing a mixture of the two.

I couldn’t resist pulling out my Strumstick and “giving things a go.” So here’s my rendition of this song, honoring my Scottish history. May your endeavors bring you bounty, may your children bring you joy, and may your lives bring you laughter and peace.

Here’s to an excellent 2015!